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Five ways to help musicians during this pandemic

This global pandemic is hurting all of us in a myriad of ways. Today I want to talk about what you can do to help your favorite musicians get through this situation.

Some of the ways will be financial, but many will be free and take little time for you to do. So while money always helps I understand you might be hurting just as much as your favorite artist. So, by all means don’t feel bad if you can’t support people financially. There are plenty of ways you can show support without spending a dime. Some of them might even be more beneficial than spending money

Buy Their Stuff

The first one is also the most obvious. If you want to help musicians buy their stuff. Support their work. Go to your favorite artists’ website and buy their music, buy their merch, join their Patreon, etc. Different musicians have different revenue streams. So see what they have to offer and purchase what you feel comfortable paying for.

Retweet, Share, and Promote their work

This is a great, free way to help the musicians you love. By sharing their social media posts you are not only spreading the word, but endorsing the artist. You’re saying “I like this artist. I like what they do. And if you like me and my tastes, you should give this a listen.” That’s a lot more genuine and has potential for a bigger impact on the person who reads it than if the artist says it. When the artist shares their stream, album release, or latest video, it feels like an ad. When a friend shares it, it feels like a recommendation from a trusted source. So sharing your favorite artists latest work/social media post might be the most impactful thing you can do.

Follow Them!

This may seems small but it’s what all musicians want. We just want you to us, to know you’re out there, and you love what we do. Follow your favorite artist. Subscribe to the their YouTube channel, like their FB page, follow them on twitter. Wherever you are on the internet following your favorite musician there means the world to them. Sometimes it’s what they want even more than money. I know that’s the case for me. The biggest thing I want is for people to read these blogs and subscribe to my YouTube channel. For me that’s the best way you can show love and support. Being an artist is hard and just knowing people are out there following, watching, and supporting goes a long way in keeping us motivated, energized, and loved.

Watch Their Streams

With no concerts or events happening for the rest of the summer and perhaps the rest of the year, live streaming has seen a huge uptick amongst musicians. Watching these streams is a huge help. It encourages artists to keep doing some form of live performance, it gives them a bigger audience, and, if they set it up, you can donate money during their stream and help them continue performing for a living. So be on the lookout for your favorite musicians stream and watch when you can.

Donate to State and National Emergency Funds

Maybe you want to help music in general and don’t have a specific artist in mind. Maybe you want t to help the entire community at large be it local or national. State and National orgs are doing great work setting up funds for musicians during these difficult times. Obviously depending on where you live the orgs that help your community will vary, but here are a few I like.

Jazz Foundation has a Covid-19 Musicians’ Emergency Fund you can donate to. While New Music USA has a Solidarity Fund geared towards new/creative/improvised music freelancers. You may also want to think about your favorite music venues and record stores. Lots of them have GoFundMe campaigns or have online deals to encourage buying merchandise online. Think of how you like to consume music, how this pandemic has effected that, and what you can do to help,

Closing Thoughts

We are all in this together this is a terrible and traumatizing situation we are all in. Some of have lost loved ones, some of us have lost our jobs, and the rest of us have to continue forward and work in these extreme circumstances. Despite everything that’s happened in 2020 I remain an optimist. We will come out stronger and we will do this together. So support your favorite musicians however you can, support your local business however you can, and don’t feel guilty if you don’t have the funds to do so. That’s why I made sure to add so many ways to help that cost nothing. Do whatever you can and if you have any additional ideas on how we can help each other leave a comment below.

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5 Takeaways from Covid-19 outbreak for artists

The Coronavirus also known as Covid-19 has dramatically impacted the lives of every American. At the time of this article everything except non essential jobs have stopped. Most of our cities are in a Stay at Home order with no end in sight. This has devastated us in many ways. As musicians and artists our lives have been turned upside down. Many of my friends have gone from having good paying jobs to no income. While this situation is dire and sad I’d like to take some time to reflect on some takeaways we can have from this situation. What can we do as musicians and artists to prepare ourselves from other disasters?

Now I don’t expect another global pandemic to happen anytime soon. But there are other scenarios that can affect our ability to make an income. Depending on your location you can experience an earthquake, hurricane, tornado, or just a general economic hardship in your community. If you plan on being a musician for life, one of these will occur near you and affect your ability to work. Covid-19 is a reminder of that. A reminder that it’s not just about mastering our musicianship, but understanding that our ability to work goes hand in hand without the local economy. You could be the greatest musician of all time but if people are hurting and unable to pay, it doesn’t matter. So what can we do to prepare for this reality? How can we be better prepared for the next economic or natural disaster? 

HAVE A SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

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I know this can be a touchy subject for people, but ultimately we live in a capitalist society and money can solve a lot of problems. Not every problem and maybe not even the important ones, but having a savings account can greatly help alleviate the financial stress we have in tough times. I myself have done a poor job of this and honestly I have no good excuse. Sure I can rattle off a bunch of unfortunate things that have happened the last couple years to justify a lack of a savings account, but honestly those are just excuses. I have to hold myself accountable. I have done a poor job prioritizing my savings and I’m sure if I was more dedicated and disciplined on it that wouldn’t be the case. We all need to have a savings account. We should all be budgeting for savings. It should not be something we think about once we make an unknown amount of money. Whether you work minimum wage or have a six figure income you should be taking a portion of that money and setting it aside for emergencies. Now how much and what your goal is that is up to you,but this should not be negotiable. Most experts say three months of bills saved up is a good savings account. That’s a lot, but again, we have to start somewhere and with something. I’m making the commitment now that I’ll never be without a savings account that has at least 1-3 months of bills set aside ever again. I urge you to make the same pledge. 

HAVE THINGS PPL CAN BUY 

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With the inability to go outside to gig, perform, and teach now is a great time to remind people of things you have for sale. You should have your online store ready and open for business. Again, this is an area I need to improve on. Having things for sale is great because this can be a way to ask for money without just asking. You could simply put up a post talking about how things are hard and you would greatly appreciate it if people would buy your music to show their support. Also be sure to have non music things for sale. Personally I love merch like T-shirts way more than music. I don’t own a record player, haven’t listened to a CD in a year, and I’d rather just stream on Spotify. Does that make me a horrible musician? Maybe, but it’s also inline with the rest of society. People don’t buy music. Whenever I do it’s usually because I just really like the person and want to support them. I’ve bought over a dozen albums on bandcamp and have never listened to one front to back on the platform. So give people something they want. I love a T-shirt because I get to support the artist and get a product I could use that looks cool. I’ll wear that shirt all year long while music I’ll probably stream elsewhere. Also get creative with alternative ways to make money. Offer private lessons, in-house concerts, sheet music, a personal song. Give people different options so you have something for everyone. 

LEARN ONLINE STREAMING 

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I’ve been very frustrated seeing how few musicians were utilizing online streaming before this pandemic. Many of my peers work in orchestras, teach at university, or play constant high paying gigs. Now all of that is gone and many now have had their income dramatically reduced or dropped to zero. So now I’m seeing a lot of my musician friends trying to do online streaming for the first time on Facebook, Instagram, Twitch, etc. Why did it take so long! I’ve been talking about the benefits of online streaming for years now and tried to show people how useful of a tool it was. I’m so upset that my friends have rested on their laurels for so long and now are suddenly scrambling to set up their streams, create a schedule, and build a fan base all in a state of emergency. So please, learn online streaming. Figure out how all the platforms work, which ones you like, which ones your fans are on, and a schedule you can commit to. THIS IS SOMETHING YOU SHOULD BE DOING AT ALL TIMES REGARDLESS.  

Gigs come and go, but having an online streaming presence as a musician is invaluable. Believe it or not I’d take 50 people watching me consistently on twitch over a $300 Saturday night gig. The 50 people on Twitch aren’t going anywhere and it can grow to so much more and while the Saturday gig has benefits that are immediate and financial, Twitch is the long term better option. Again, you shouldn’t be picking one over the other. You should be doing both. For too long musicians have been picking the money. This is a time to learn online streaming and adapt to our changing world. 

HAVING A PATERON 

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Having long term funding is a good thing. Patreon allows for that to happen. Using Patreon can be a way for you to fund the time you need for making YouTube videos or to steam regularly on Twitch. The beauty of this is you can keep it going forever and have all your hardcore fans on one key platform. Having something like Patreon is great particularly in times of financial duress because again you can encourage people to support you on Patreon and have tiers that are low enough for anyone to be a part of. 

WEBSITE/SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS UP TO DATE 

Again, the internet is vital to your career. Make sure you are active on all the social media platforms you like. The key ones are Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tiktok, LinkedIn and Snapchat. Honestly you should be on every platform but if that seems too daunting try them all out and pick a few to be consistent on. Website is even more important. The website you own. Social media will come and go so make sure you have a good website. Either learn how to make a website using WordPress and Wix templates or hire someone to help you. Look at other musicians websites and see what you like and what you don’t like. So many musicians have terrible websites that look like they were made in the 90s. They are clunky, cluttered, and hard to navigate. Even good musicians can have bad websites. Don’t be one of them. 

CONCLUSION 

This is a tough time for all of us. So I hope these takeaways can be useful for you to improve your career now and in the future. I know this can be a lot to digest so feel free to come back to this later if you don’t feel up to it at this time. But do come back to it. I firmly believe these are must do tasks for every musician. So take them seriously and address them as needed. And, as always, leave any questions, comments, or feedback below.